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Ring in the New Year Resolved to Improve Your Health

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're thinking about making some health-related resolutions for 2019, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some suggestions.

"This is the perfect time of year for each of us to consider our personal goals, and how we can make positive health choices in the coming year," said AMA President Dr. Barbara McAneny.

"We encourage everyone to prioritize their long-term health by making small lifestyle changes now that can have a lasting effect in improving their health," she added in an AMA news release.

The association offers some tips that can make a big difference in your health:

  • Learn your risk for type 2 diabetes: Take a self-screening test at DoIHavePrediabetes.org. If you're at risk, the website lists steps that can help you prevent or delay development of the blood sugar disease.
  • Get regular exercise: Adults should get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity, or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity activity.
  • Know your blood pressure: Get high blood pressure under control to help prevent heart attack or stroke.
  • Eat a healthy diet: Cut down on processed foods, especially those with added salt and sugar, as well as sugar-sweetened beverages. Drink more water.
  • Help prevent antibiotic resistance: If you're prescribed antibiotics, take them exactly as directed. Remember: Antibiotics aren't effective against viruses, including those that cause colds and flu.
  • Limit alcohol and tobacco: If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation -- no more than one drink a day for women and two for men. If you use tobacco, talk to your doctor about quitting.
  • Be careful with painkillers: If you're prescribed opioid pain medications, follow your doctor's instructions, store them safely, and properly dispose of unused pills to prevent misuse or theft.
  • Immunize: Be sure everyone in your family is up to date on vaccinations, including the annual flu shot for everyone 6 months or older.
  • Control stress: Healthy eating and regular exercise can help maintain good mental health, but seek help from a friend or professional if you need it.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on healthy living.

SOURCE: American Medical Association, news release, Dec. 17, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=740755

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Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
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