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Taking a Bite Out of Food Ads Targeted to Kids

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids can be as strongly influenced by TV commercials as by the shows themselves, and many studies have found that tempting food ads have a particularly harmful effect, contributing to childhood obesity.

While the government has stepped in with nutrition guidelines for manufacturers, these are largely voluntary and, therefore, not enforceable. So it's up to parents to be vigilant.

It might seem like the odds are stacked against you.

According to a study in the journal Childhood Obesity, most food and beverage products in ads seen by 2- to 11-year-olds during kids' programming don't meet the guidelines of the government's Interagency Working Group. The panel includes representatives of the Federal Trade Commission, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Agriculture.

Plus, less than half of TV ads during kids' programming meet the guidelines created by the food industry's own voluntary group, the study found.

While some companies have improved the nutritional quality of some of their foods, these aren't the products they're advertising. The vast majority of ads seen during children's programming are for products high in what dietary guidelines call "nutrients to limit" -- fat, salt and sugar. The same is true for the more than 3 billion food ads that appear every year on popular websites for kids, according to research published in the journal Pediatric Obesity.

But you can counter the effects of tempting ads. Point out to your kids that the visuals are made to get them excited about the food, but the message may not be realistic. For instance, a cereal isn't going to give them super powers. Letting kids know about marketing will help them better evaluate merits of any product as they get older and start making their own healthy decisions.

Another key step is to keep their viewing in the family or living room so that you see what they see. A study done on sugary drink consumption found that a parent's positive influence was undermined when kids had a TV in their bedroom.

More information

Healthy Food America has more on steps to limit the effects of ads on your kids.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=742292

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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