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Cooking With Whole Grains

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Feb. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to getting the best taste and the greatest nutritional value from grains, keep it whole grain.

Quinoa, oats, short-grain brown rice and wild rice, polenta (which is made from corn) and barley are most nutritious in their whole, unprocessed form. That's because the bran is still intact, and the bran is where most of the minerals, vitamins and plenty of fiber reside.

Processed and packaged foods are rarely made from 100 percent whole grains. Think of them as empty carbs with lots of preservatives, so switch to these flavorful grains to load up on nutrition, including essential minerals and even some protein.

Tip: Don't be fooled by the word "multi-grain" on packages -- this does not mean that a variety of or even any whole grains were used.

Brown rice is high in magnesium and tryptophan, barley is high in selenium and tryptophan, and steel cut oats are high in manganese and zinc. These grains are simple to prepare. Bring water to a boil, add your grains and cook on low heat for about 45 minutes until tender. Remove from the heat and keep covered for 5 minutes to allow the grains to fluff, then stir with a fork.

Quinoa is another excellent choice, high in iron and manganese, plus it's quicker to cook than the other grains. Rinse a cup of dry quinoa under cold running water, then add it to 2 cups of boiling water. Cover and simmer for about 20 minutes.

Use cooked grains in any dish that calls for white rice or pasta. If you're eating them plain, you can still get creative with tasty "add-ins" like dried cranberries on breakfast oatmeal or barley, a drizzle of balsamic on brown rice and a sprinkle of Parmesan on quinoa.

More Great Grains

  • Amaranth
  • Bulgur
  • Buckwheat
  • Kasha (toasted buckwheat)
  • Spelt
  • Farro
  • Millet

More information

The American Heart Association has more on preparing whole grains.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=742458

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Water
Minerals
Manganese
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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